Traveling Solo in BKK | Eat Like a Local

“Most travel, and certainly the rewarding kind, involves depending on the kindness of strangers, putting yourself into the hands of people you don’t know and trusting them with your life. This risky suspension of disbelief is often an experience freighted with anxiety.”

While travel writer Paul Theroux put himself in the hands of a driver at the border of Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan in 2006 (read Ghost Train to the Eastern Star), I was lucky to have met Book, my “personal foodie guide” who’d spent two days and nights with me exploring the city (and also cared to send me back to the hostel in the middle of the night).

 

Our first meal was a pleasant lunch at his go-to place for a relaxed meal — Khao Jao Bangkok in the hip and trendy Thonglor. As this is a district where most Japanese expats hang out at, not only that the menu is trilingual, but also the simple, home-like interior made use of the natural sunlight and is decorated with furnitures made of reclaimed wood as well as anime toys and figures. “Khao jao” means long grain rice.

 

Thai Papaya Salad, Stir-fried Salted Turnip with Eggs, Stir-fried Minced Pork with Black Olives; Khao Jao, Bangkok Starting with the smaller dishes, Thai Papaya Salad (THB80) was fresh and excitingly hot. Book says the spice generally defines Southern Thai cuisine.

Stir-fried Salted Turnip with Eggs (THB70-80?) was nice but quite ordinary to me in terms of the texture and the taste. I’d say it’s best to have a bowl of rice to with it, to tone down its excess saltiness.

Stir-fried Minced Pork with Black Olives (THB70-80?) too reminded me of a Chinese home-cooked dish that’s essentially the same. Salty and spicy, very flavorful, cooked with seasoned minced pork and chopped water spinach.

 

Green Curry Fried Rice with Fish (THB80) came with this pronounced flavors of fragrant Thai herbs and was slightly spicy, but after a few spoonful I felt that it’s a tad bit drying in the mouth. Rice with green curry on the side might have been a better option.

Pork Spare Ribs Spicy Soup (THB80) was a tasty clear soup, with the sour-spiciness of Tom Yum that whetted my appetite. But I couldn’t have more than one bowl because it’s too hot to bear!

 

On another day, Book brought me to Victory Monument. We walked along the skywalk upon exiting from the MRT, looking at the military monument on our left that stood in the middle of a roundabout.

It didn’t take long until we turned right into a canal bridge with street food stalls lined up on both sides, and saw Best Boat Noodles (orange uniform) and Ruathong Noodles (pink uniform), which I preferred better.

 

They stay true to the tradition of serving in small portions when this could avoid spilling when eating on the wobbly boats, and it actually makes the experience super fun because when your noodles are gone in two slurps, and you order more and can form a stack of bowls next to you in no time!

The splash of pig’s blood broth was savoury in Thai Noodles with Pork Meatballs (THB12) and Thai Noodles with Beef Meatballs (THB12). I thought a pinch of chilli flakes added excitement.

 

The bigger bowls were the delicious Stewed Beef Noodles topped with coriander and deep fried garlic that reminded me of famous ones from Taiwan, and the rich, sweet and creamy Khao Soi (Coconut Curry Noodle Soup with Chicken) with strands of fried egg toppings that gave me an idea of Northern Thai cuisine, a reverse of the piquant food down south.

 

Me finishing everything; Ruathong Noodles, Bangkok With local Thais around me, I knew I was at the right place. And as you can see, I had altogether 4 small ones and 2 big ones that were equivalent to… I guess 6 small ones?! That added up to a shocking 10 for a petite-sized like me. Book was in awe and so was myself.

– JD

My favourite Canteen…

This is the 3rd day I’m officially unemployed.

I’m never a very nostalgic person, though there are a few things that I kind of miss after a year working at the company and eating out occasionally… Singapore and Malaysia Canteen is on the list.

Exterior; Singapore and Malaysia Canteen

It’s inside a Market next to a ferry concourse, meaning it’s not particularly comfy when there’s this heat and humidity in the summer. I can bear with that, however, for the food:

The Noodle with Singapore Dark Soya Sauce (HK$35) comes in generous portion and is my usual order on warmer days, whereas the slurp-worthy Noodle with Pepper Soup (HK$38) might be your new cold winter fave that promises to warm your bones for hours on end. I like to order them with:

  • the savoury, unbeatable Barbecued Pork Neck Meat
  • the gelatinous, comforting Braised Chicken Leg and Pork Leg
  • the simple, delicious Barbecued Lemongrass Chicken Steak

It’s nice to have a drink too – I’d either have the simple, refreshing Iced Barley Water (HK$16) or the satisfying Singapore and Malaysia Milk Tea with Ginger Sauce (HK$15), depending on the weather.

 

Despite all the above that I loved and kept going back to, I have a few **REMINDERS** for you upon your visit:

  1. Do not order rice. The rice is always in that unbelievable gooey state, and you can imagine how bad it can get when drenched in chicken oil if you order it with Hainan Chicken;
  2. 8/10 times they will bring you the wrong dishes – after a fairly long wait; and
  3. If you love barbecued pork neck and Hainan Chicken, visit early because they tend to be the first two menu items that run out.

 

Singapore and Malaysia Canteen
Shop 20, 1/F, Kwun Tong Pier Cooked Food Market, Kwun Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
T. +852 2344 2347

– Jude